The Wisdom and Wealth Podcast

Earl Crochet: Intangible Balance Sheet Episode 56

December 02, 2023 Joshua Klooz
The Wisdom and Wealth Podcast
Earl Crochet: Intangible Balance Sheet Episode 56
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Welcome to another incredible Intangible Balance Sheet Conversation with Earl Crochet. There are some incredible stories inside today's episode. See below for some of the topics we cover. Enjoy! 

  • The influence of heritage
  • Impact of family background and experiences on one's life
  • Earl talks about his family's immigration history, mentioning French and Scottish sides
  • Shares stories of how his parents met and the challenges they faced
  • Attending 16 schools due to his father's construction work
  • His journey into engineering and his realization of adaptability
  • The differences between project managers and engineers, highlighting adaptability
  • The value of problem-solving in engineering and the importance of understanding the problem
  • Meeting his wife in college, facing challenges
  • Discusses the importance of finding joy in stress and avoiding a sense of bitterness
  • Pursue work that makes you happy 
  • Remember your path is unique 
  • The rewards of being dependable and trusted
  • Stresses the importance of enjoying the journey and gratitude
  • Eulogy that reflects his love for his wife, taking care of his family, and coaching and mentoring others

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JOSH KLOOZ, CFP®, MBA
WEALTH ADVISOR

Phone 281.719.0036
Text 281.699.8691
Fax 281.719.0156
jklooz@carsonwealth.com

1780 Hughes Landing | Suite 570
The Woodlands, TX 77380

Music by bensound.com




Josh Klooz:

Welcome in to this episode of Wisdom and Wealth. Today's episode is another of our Intangible Balance Sheet series and it's my honor to introduce Earl Crochet of the podcast, as he's agreed to come on and share a little bit more about his Intangible Balance Sheet. Earl, thank you for joining us and welcome to the podcast.

Earl Crochet:

Thanks for having me, and I look forward to it, likewise, and Earl.

Josh Klooz:

So before we dive in, you might just give us, our listeners, just a brief introduction to yourself, before we dive into the intangible questions and so on and so forth.

Earl Crochet:

Yeah, I've had the pleasure of being married to my wife for 40 years, as of earlier this month. Congratulations, thank you for 35. So I had her before I had a career. I'm an engineer and MBA by training and I've worked in all the guys my whole life and it's I am blessed beyond. I'm playing with the house's money, to use kind of a gambling term at this point. So you know I appreciate you reaching out and talking and you know I tell people I'm like one of the most boring people in the world. But some people think they disagree with my assertion there.

Josh Klooz:

But we'll see. I have a feeling I disagree with that and I don't even don't even know that the half of it yet. So one of the things that I've tried to dive more into is the degree to which our heritage is influenced by our grandparents and even our parents. But for those backing up a step before that, for those that are newer to the podcast, we call it the intangible balance sheet, because I believe the things we value most in life are Just that they're intangible. We're irrational in many cases about the things that we hold dear. You know, given any amount of money, there are certain experiences that we wouldn't trade right, whether it be our family, whether it be experiences that we had in our career that taught us a lot or that were meaningful to us given circumstances that revolved at that particular time. But I'm always curious how our grandparents, maybe even some cases great grandparents, influence our lives. And, earl, are there any stories in your lineage that you look back on? And, to quote the movie, when the myth becomes a legend? You know, prince the Legend?

Earl Crochet:

I think that there's a lot of stories, but my family for lack of a better term were kind of storytellers and so there were stories on both sides of mine, my mother's side of the family and my father's side, and, to be honest, some of them I haven't. I don't really want to investigate too far because I might find a, but you know, my father's side is from South Louisiana. We got kicked out of France, we got kicked out of Nova Scotia. We ended up in Louisiana. We've been there. Actually, I think if you look at the old family photos, I think we're actually Italian. I think it's like a witness relocation because they all look. If you look at the photos from the 30s my grandfather there they look very mobster-y, right. So great story, and I'm not sure it's true. And the other side is, to use the current term, native American and Scottish. My maternal grandfather was actually born on the boat on the way over from Scotland, but they hid his pregnancy or his birth until they were in New York Harbor, so he would be quote, an American citizen. Oh, wow, which I kind of. And so you know, in fact, when I was little, you know, cajun or was not necessarily a good thing, you know the Indian was not a good thing, the immigrant so kind of grew up with that little bit of chip on, you know, shoulder. Neither one of my parents graduated high school, you know, for various reasons and so anyway so it's just been, you know, kind of the underdog, and you know you got to go out and get. You know, as my dad used to say, you got to make hay while the sun shines. And you know all those great philosophical lessons. As you hate as a kid and a teenager and as you, you know magically, all of a sudden you realize how smart your parents were.

Josh Klooz:

So anyway, and so it is sad. It occurs to me that it's sad that so many of folks in today's society were so modern. They don't even understand that what that phrase fully means. Right, there's a short window of time that you got to get all your leverage. But I am curious, before I forget, what port did your family immigrate to? So it was just brought to my attention a few months back that Galveston used to be like a big immigration port back in the day before. You know, we always associate New York. But is your family?

Earl Crochet:

do you have records, or the French side of the family just showed up way back before their record. The Scottish side actually showed up in Ellis Island and in Slype you know you talked about stories. Their name was Mac Interkin. There's actually a past in Scotland. Well, the two brothers got into like a fight and they wanted to Americanize their name. So they dropped the Mac, the MC, so they became Interkin. But then they somehow got cross ways so they changed the spellings one's ER and one's R-E. And I'd always heard this story growing up and I actually met somebody at work about 15 years ago whose name was the. We were the ER and he's the R-E and we were able to trace back that we are, you know, distant cousins because he's the side of the family that got mad and went off in a different direction. So at least one bit of the story, the history, was actually true, because I have proof of it now.

Josh Klooz:

That is so neat. Now, Earl, with regard to your parents, are there any stories that live on your intangible balance sheet? And it shaped kind of either your trajectory or the way you think about life.

Earl Crochet:

Well it's, you know, they were both. They had different lives, but the one story, the two stories I love to tell about them. The first one is how they met. My father was a shore patrol in the Navy. He was in the Navy for a number of years during Korea afterwards. And the story of how they met is my mom and her older sister were on a double date with two guys on the beach and they were either on the base or near the base and my dad and his partner found them and would not let them go until the girls gave them their numbers so they could go out. And that's literally how my parents met. So it was, you know, and a very whirlwind romance. And then there was a big deal back. You know, back years ago that women wanted to be June brides and so my mother wanted to get married in June and they grieved and the last day of June you know we're not talking big fancy church wedding, we're just talking about getting hitched but the last day of June in 1961 was a Sunday and back then you couldn't get married in Florida on a Sunday. So my mother, my father and my grandmother her mom got on the train and went into Georgia and go to the first you know train, stop, get off, go knock on the justice of peace and he won't marry him. So then my grandmother calls him aside and has a little conversation and he greets the mayor, found out later that my grandmother told the justice of the peace that my mother was in the quote family way and that this man didn't marry her, he was gonna kill her, she was gonna kill him and she had a 45 in her purse. I wasn't born for three years. So either my mother's record for the longest pregnancy on record or my grandmother may have been fudging a little bit. But and my grandmother really did carry it back before concealed carry it on, she did have them. So anyway you know we're different breed here, but anyway you know. But those are the kinds of things I grew up with.

Josh Klooz:

You know, it's like that's normal for us, so the other piece that I will always ask guests about is we'll call them barbershop biographies. But there's typically, in a community that you grow up in, the smaller it's typically, you know, more prevalent. In the smaller community that you grew up in, the more prevalent it is. But was there, are there, any mentors that you grew up with, or was there any kind of ethos or ethic of your community that sticks with you to this day?

Earl Crochet:

Well, yes, no, I see I have probably a different story from mine. I actually went to 16 schools where I got out of high school.

Josh Klooz:

Okay.

Earl Crochet:

So the never completed a single grade until I was in eighth grade at one school. My dad was a construction worker at that time and he just moved us around. So I literally went to two kinders, two firsts and to the eighth grade was the first year. But I went to the same school district, one of them three times in Michigan and one of them twice in Mississippi. So again, as a kid that was normal, even though it was very not normal. But what I learned from that is I'm fairly adaptable, because you kind of have to be. Especially. We tended to move north to south a lot and so the you know we didn't have cable and all the other stuff. The language was distinct. What you call, you know, in the north it's a pop or so, in the south it's a Coke, regardless of what it is. And anyway. So I attribute part of my adaptability of which is a little weird for engineers, because engineers tend to be very linear, but I'm not, so it's okay, but it was just normal to me. But what? The most construction workers in that situation? They have a base home and they travel and they come home and visit my dad, wanted his family with him. So, you know, the longest ever state anywhere was three years. Ultimately, the shortest was four weeks, but so it's kind of like you're always waiting for the. You know. I mean literally my dad would come home on Friday and say we're moving, pack up, and you know. So it makes you a little more adaptable as an adult, because I'm, you know, whereas my wife and she was born and raised in St County and so she lived in the same town her entire life until she met me and I'm drug her all over the country.

Josh Klooz:

So Now, typically with someone with an engineering mind, there's a story of when they kind of fell in love with how things work, why they work that way, and they figured out hey, I'm pretty good at this. Is there something that stands out for you?

Earl Crochet:

Yeah, well, as I mentioned earlier on, neither one of my parents finished high school and so both very intelligent people, just situations. So my father started telling me and I mean, this sounds like one of those made-up stories, but I was doing my mother's checkbook at eight. I was really good at math, math and sorry and moving all the time. I was the chunky little geeky kid, so you know, not the most popular. So I tended to go math, science, things like that. I was really good at that. And so for the time I was eight years old, my dad told me I was gonna be an engineer. I had no clue what that meant or anything else. And then we got in high school and, to the point, I'm sure you never did this, but some of the other guys can probably appreciate it If your father tells you go left, you tend to go right. Or if he's pulling for Dallas, you're pulling for somebody you know, the Texans or something. So when I went to college, I refused to go in engineering. I went into pre-law and after one semester was miserable and a mentor. One of my teachers was like what are you doing? You need to be over in engineering. You know, that was the. So it. And I had no clue. Again, nobody, nobody ever gone to college. So I was charting new territory on my own and I knew engineer, right that's. You know you play the numbers in math and science. I had no clue what it was and there were three. There was a list on the wall. I didn't know the difference but I chose. I you can say it's coincidence, I prefer it, it's like divine intervention. So the top was chemical and I didn't like, I didn't want to take an inorganic chemistry. The second was electrical I don't like wires. The third was mechanical. I went nah, it sounds good, but dad's, you know, and it was the perfect fit for me, cause it's a little bit of everything, we're all over the place and you know, I truly do attribute it to you know, I was kind of like lost in the wilderness and there it was and it seems to work out for me Okay.

Josh Klooz:

So if I had to summarize the mechanical engineering space and I'm going to do this, hopefully don't do disservice, but it's it's the normal person that looks at it says, yeah, there's a, there's a solution for that. And a mechanical engineer goes no, there's a precise solution for that.

Earl Crochet:

And here here are the steps, right, like yeah, Well, I figured out again, not knowing, but I figured out in the industry, especially in oil and gas. Engineers and like project managers tend to be interchangeable, but they're really two distinct skillsets. A good project manager has to think three or four steps ahead and in different, whereas an engineer, a true engineer, is very linear step A, step B, step B. I never fell in that category and it used to bother me, and then I, and then I finally realized, you know, it's like any other profession, Everybody's not the same. There's a reason there's stereotypes, and the reason Gilbert was so popular years ago because that's the average engineer is I work for it with a lot of those guys and I'm a little more social than than a stereotypical engineer.

Josh Klooz:

But the that has to be a value to know like well, hey, I've got a speed bump coming, you know, down down the line, what, what, what is it? What's the solution for it, rather than just meeting it and being completely deflated?

Earl Crochet:

And that's, that's part of the planning process, and, and again, as a, as a project manager doing big projects, you have to think to you know, what about? What about if you're raised tomorrow? What about the contract doesn't show up, what, what? You know, what about it? What about it? And I seem to have an aptitude for that, and then, and ultimately, engineering is in in my. It's not a textbook definition, but it's solving problems, and whether that's, you know, building a road or making a spaceship or whatever, you're solving a problem, you know you're, and and if you can get that mindset, then you just gotta. You have to understand what, the what. The problem is, though, and that's the, that's the, that's the, that's the art in the science. There is understanding what, the answer. You know you can, you can run formulas all day long. That's easy. It's understanding what's going on.

Josh Klooz:

So Absolutely so. There are, whether it be like chapters in our autobiography or whether it, whether you want to call it like the pegs of our life, that are kind of the pivotal points in our life that we, we assign some, some meaning to personally. Are there any kind of pegs within your life that you look back on and you're like hey, I'm so glad for that experience, I'm so glad for the you know the way that that directed the course of my life that you look back on and wouldn't mind sharing with us?

Earl Crochet:

Oh, absolutely the. The number one is meeting my wife. At college. I was on a full ride scholarship for academics and, due to inattention and you know, some personal issues, after three semesters the school said, no, you're done. Fortunately I met her. I was not in a good place, but again, divide Intervention. She and I started dating. It was funny. I went from the semester I met her, I had a 165 GPA and a year later we were married and I had four O GPA and Karen. 18 hours, oh, and too much effort to get married to house, for living in birth, to the ground, and we lose everything we own and she's with child. So, yeah, it's, you know it's a. There's a stress thing, there's a stress guy. You know, like I was like two and a half times past. You know you're done. And one of the stories I love to tell is that so I carry 18 hours of engineering, I get a four O, the only four O in my undergraduate career. My parents come into town, my mom walks in the door and I say look, mom, you know, here it is. She walks right past me and hugs my wife and I went what, what, what are you doing? She said if it wasn't for her, you would have done it. My mother did this great way of, you know, toting down my ego and putting me back, and she was absolutely right and and I anyway. So, and in the you know, losing everything you have. You know, you know people tell the story, you know. Well, when your mom and I met, you know we didn't have anything. Well, why should? I can literally say we have nothing. That's all quick, quick, I breathe. So I used to work in a grocery store. I went to college full-time. I worked in this little hotel grocery store and On Saturday it was a Saturday I was scheduled working to meet, which I didn't know at the time, was actually illegal because I was only 19 years old and you know, you know, supposed to work till 21 in the meat market, but it's Mississippi, so I like where my oldest clothes? Because I'm gonna be literally cutting meat all day, chickens and it's nasty, it's you know. And a couple hours into it they said your wife's on the phone and she's crying. So I answered the phone and all I could hear is Come home and fire, I mean. And so Just slam the phone down, get in my car, and I'm about five miles away, and three miles. I get behind the fire truck because where we live was Rural so was it and I couldn't pass the fire truck because the roads are too skinny and they were doing like 45 miles an hour and I. So I get there, the houses, you know, obviously on fire there's all the neighbors we live on the country, all the neighbors. So I Check on her and she's okay, and peel her off of me in the fire. So, hey, will you want to fight the fire? I went, yeah, sure, it's my house. I mean, had no training, no, nothing. So they put me on the front of the hose and I go in the house and we got it down to about the size of a piano. I got upright piano and we ran out of water and it took 20 minutes to get more, more watering. By that time the house was gone. Anyway, that was on Saturday. So the only clothes I have, or like this nasty you know, and anyway, local church donated a few hundred dollars to us and back then you shut blue off, so we couldn't even go buy clothes on Sunday because there weren't anything open. Anyway, well, my wife had been about to take a bath and she had taken her rings off and so they were all in the house. So she saw the fire, grabbed the road, jumped out, ran a couple acres to a neighbor so she lost her Engagement ring. Wedding man now we're talking Chintzy, right, because I'm a college student with no money, but it was still, you know, her class ring now other year. Well, wednesday I skipped class and I knew because I knew where I was and I dug through these still hot coals of the house and I found all the rings and everything. I go to local jeweler store and I give them this sob story and they said we'll take care, they clean them up. And that weekend my parents came into town to try to figure out what we're gonna do, and and they, we went out to dinner and I handed her the rings. Right, it's just, you know Gushing and you know boo. I mean it's a great story, I mean it's no. So we got married very early and I wasn't the smartest, you know when, the sharpest tool in the shed back then, and so occasionally I would do stupid stuff. So every time I did something stupid earlier on marriage I'd go. You remember, honey, I, um, I skipped school and dug through the app and you know so, around our senior anniversary, I did something and I did. She said, no, no, you're done, you've used it, but it's still a great story, I think, to tell people that.

Josh Klooz:

Oh yeah, absolutely. And but I would venture to guess that, even though you were stressed, you probably were pretty Happy and to a degree, because it brings it brings things to the surface of what you're truly grateful for in the moment you know.

Earl Crochet:

You know I don't think I think very few people want to have bad times or bad situations health issue but I think sometimes you need those to understand. If it's always good, if it's always sunshiney and in 70 degrees, you don't appreciate the good weather. If, unless you've had bad weather, if you've been sick or something. So for us, I mean we had no choice. I mean I talked to people all the time and they're like how can you be married, you know so young and safe? I said I don't mind intervention, I'm lucky, I'm blessed, I think, the right woman, you know it and and she's always real, you know well. But it's kind of shy about it. I was like I would be either dead or under a bridge. It's not Overplaying. You know, she gave me a focus and we had the door and that gave me a focus that got me through college. I don't I would not advocate that path for most people, but for me it's probably the only way I would have ever gotten and so, again, it works for us. She was my friend before we started dating. She's been my best friend for 41 years now. You know I'm a boring guy. Hang out with my wife.

Josh Klooz:

And that's enough. That's awesome. No, arles, you think I want you to think four generations from now. Yeah, you're great-grandchildren's generation, or your community. You know the great-grandchildren in your community. Are there any other events in life similar to what you just mentioned that you feel would be most instructive for them, and why?

Earl Crochet:

as far as you is an event, you know there's obviously when you've been around as long as I have, you have lots of events. But one of the things that I Encouraged my kids and I'm not encouraging my grandkids my oldest granddaughter is actually in college, so that should tell you something but is that I've tried to stress to them, especially young people. Quite often you have to go to college right, that's kind of the mantra these days and you have to make money, and what I'm trying to get them is you need money to live off of, obviously, but if you're not happy and that's different for different people if you wanna cut grass for a living and that makes you happy, you can do it. I've worked with too many miserable people over the years and seen people who went and got a degree for the money or for some other reason, and one of the things I've advised I did talk a couple weeks ago at a conference on leadership and one of the things that the problems most people have is they think that their employees want what they want, and quite often everybody's different. Some people just wanna put in their hour and go to the lake or go hunting or golf or whatever, and that's okay because it's up to them and that's my older grandkids are starting to and it's like look, just if you wanna go to college, go to college, get a degree. If you don't like it, do something else. It's not when you're young, it's like you've got it. If you're an accountant, no, you can go do something else, the paper's good and it just opens doors. But if you don't like what you're doing, don't be miserable. Anyway, that's different for everybody and I don't know. I didn't like I said I almost messed up because I was told from the time I was eight years old, I was going to college being an engineer and of course I didn't make it later, but that was right. But besides that, it's different for everyone. And I don't know, I think we've lost, I mean, some of that. Everybody do their own thing. It's not everybody do their own thing, but you have to enjoy what you're doing. Life is too short to be miserable. Counseling a lot of former employees and colleagues in mind even if you don't like it, go somewhere else. I never wanted to be the bitter old guy and at least to this point I succeeded. One thing I've seen, you know, didn't want to hate to get up and go to work anymore.

Josh Klooz:

Yeah Well, and so I can remember just personally, like I have loved being dependent on as long as I can remember, and I attribute that to my dad, right, I wanted to be able to be useful to my dad, right. So it's so hard to me of like if somebody, to your point, is miserable, like it's one of the greatest rewards that you can get in life is to be dependent on and trusted to do something Right. So you're like short circuiting the gift in a way in that perspective. But I really appreciate that and so I betrayed him. A financial planner. The only thing that is. There are two things that are really hard for me is with I sense that the husband and wife are not on the same page if I'm counseling a couple financially, and the other is if somebody doesn't enjoy what they do, because I almost feel disingenuous, because I love what I do, right, like it is a gift, I feel lucky to do it every day, and so, anyway, long way of saying it resonates with me what you're saying. You know, to the point of I wish more people had that perspective.

Earl Crochet:

You know again, you know how you want to describe it intervention or wandering into it. I wanted into engineering, I wanted in this company. It was the perfect company. The little niche I felt in turned out you know these big tanks that store gas and fuel in. And literally my first day they said you're the new tank guy? And I went okay, what's that mean? And they went, well, you got these. I went okay. I said are you gonna pay me? And they went, yeah, we're good. And you know I want to do a talk next year at a conference that I'm kind of the force gum of tanks. It's if you in the movie force gum, you know he happens to be just in the right place at the right time. You know, and that's kind of looking back on my life and career I just happen to be in the, you know right. You know not as famous I haven't met a president yet, but you know there's still time but just little things that I've been involved in that you know I would have never had no clue, but for me it's worked out. You know it's worked out really well and it's let me be able to provide for my family and go to all kinds of cool places and I don't know it. Just, I literally say a little prayer every day, thinking where I'm at and what I've been able to do. You know it's not perfect by any stretch of imagination and but I'm just so grateful that you know, and it's one of those things, and will freely admit and I try to tell others I did not appreciate it years ago as much as I do now and one of the things I mentor, I mentor some younger folks on various subjects and I tell you know, make sure you, you know you're making a living and you know you've got a job and you've got kids and you got a career and you're doing it. Enjoy it, yeah, because it, you know it goes faster than you think is you know there's a reason for those sayings than it is. So enjoy not everything's enjoyable, I mean, I'll be the first one to admit it, but enjoy what you got, yeah absolutely Now, earl.

Josh Klooz:

The last question that I typically ask guess, is if you're to look backward and think about your eulogy, what do you hope? What do you hope are some of the things that are in your eulogy when you look back on and when others look back on your life?

Earl Crochet:

I hope that they acknowledge that I love my wife and I took care of my family. I would be the first. You know, as a lot of people, a lot of guys especially. You know, I know that a. You know, for over 35 years, you know I've had a job and been working. You know myself and my career kind of tied together, obviously, but fortunately for me, I was married for five years, almost four years the career. So you know it's that. I've had people, I've had relatives tell me that you know we set the bar too high and it's not like we don't have have never gotten into. You know it's not like we agree on everything, but you know it works for us. And so you know I coach my kids. I've coached a couple of grandkids. I've been there for them. You know, all jokes about college football aside, you know I try to be there for them. I take an interest. You know. Hopefully I learned a little something, you know. You know I love them all. I mean it's my family. I can get another job. If my finance, you know, somebody stole all my money, I'd cry. But I just keep working. And you know, when you have nothing, everything's up after that. So you know, and we, you know, as most Americans we have so much junk. Now we need to, I need to do a clean, you know. But I try to be grateful for what you know and you know we talked about grandparents early on. You know, I remember when my grand, when we were going to eat, my grandfather would pay the bill right, because that was what we did, and then it was a point before he passed away that my dad started paying the bill right, and then it was a point before my dad passed away that I started paying the bill. You know, now there's nobody left and I still have to get all the bills. I'm waiting. But you know, I'm the picture. I'm kind of enjoying this and I hope I get to be the picture for a long time. You know, I also try to remind my grandkids that I'm worth more alive than I am dead. I don't want anybody to try to knock me off for the inheritance.

Josh Klooz:

So subtle but but important to remind people of that you know.

Earl Crochet:

But I don't know. I mean you know the career, I mean you know, I've heard the analogy about you know, people tend to focus so much on their career. Right, and they got to do the job and they do it. And the reality is, if you, if you quit, you know they may miss you, but it's like sticking your hand in a bucket of water and pulling it out. That hole that you leave is the same hole. There's no hole, it just collapses back in. And so you know, and if you're, if you're not fortunate enough to have a spouse or a family, then find, you know, find friends, and you know it's, it's got to be more than just a paycheck. And that's where you know. And I will fully admit there's been a couple of times in my career that I got really focused and, you know, dedicated, and my wife would kind of go honey, knock, knock, you need to come back a little bit. And I was like, okay, another good reason why she's around to take care of me.

Josh Klooz:

So Well, earl, I've enjoyed this conversation so much. Are there any other thoughts that we haven't gotten to, or anything else that you'd like to share before we part?

Earl Crochet:

No, I appreciate the opportunity. It's. You know the. There's an old saying you know youth, whether youth is wasted on the young or whatever. And I don't know what, what 60s and new 40 or something, I don't know. There's all these things. You know times are definitely different, right? I mean, people are. People live longer. We have healthier lives, you know you get a chance to do different things. And you know my wife and I have a. We have a somewhat extensive bucket list, if you were calling that, of things. There's few places we haven't been, you know, and things. So it's always a balance. And as a financial planner, I'm sure you know, as kind of the leader of the family, you know I want to have fun but I also don't want to. I don't want to be dependent on the kids one day. So there's there's, you know there's, there's a I'm saving up to die you know, that's essentially what I've discovered.

Josh Klooz:

You know, just kidding, I'm kidding aside, but yeah.

Earl Crochet:

But, but you know, but again, I've been so blessed and you know what, what I like? More money. Sure, Somebody wants to, you know, but it's not the money, it's the, it's the, it's the experiences. We're going on a big family vacation this weekend with the entire family and you know, it's those kind of things and I hope, you know, hopefully, many years down the road when they do the yields, I hope the grandkids can, will remember these, you know, these, these occurrences, that's what I hope.

Josh Klooz:

So yeah, and the lessons that they learned along the way in that time too. So, earl, this has been such a treat. Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it. We wish you and your family nothing but truth, beauty and goodness on the road ahead, and hopefully our paths cross again sometime soon.

Earl Crochet:

Okay, Appreciate it, that's it.

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